Hold On to Those "Flying Tanks": Mi-35 Attack Helicopters to Serve India's Skies Until 2030

Hold On to Those Flying Tanks: Mi-35 Attack Helicopters to Serve India's Skies Until 2030


The Indian Air Force (IAF) is giving its fleet of "flying tanks" a new lease on life! These trusty Mi-35 attack helicopters, known for their ruggedness and firepower, will stay in service until 2030. This decision comes as the IAF gradually transitions its helicopter fleet towards more modern platforms.

The IAF previously operated two squadrons of Mi-35s, a Soviet-era design that's packed a punch for many years. However, with the introduction of the state-of-the-art Boeing AH-64E Apache helicopters in 2019-2020, one squadron was phased out.

So why keep the Mi-35s around? The answer lies in the gap between the old and the new. The IAF needs to maintain its attack helicopter capabilities while its new fleet is fully operational. This is where the indigenously developed Light Combat Helicopter (LCH) Prachand comes in. This homegrown hero, designed by Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL), is being inducted to fill the gap. The IAF has plans to acquire a total of 66 Prachands, with 10 already patrolling the skies.

Once the Prachands are fully deployed and pilots are trained, the Mi-35s are expected to take a well-deserved retirement. This extension ensures the IAF has a robust attack helicopter force throughout this modernization process. While the Mi-35s might not be the newest choppers on the block, they'll continue to be a valuable asset for the IAF until the Prachands are ready to take over completely.
 
Why they phased as apache are junk in the Himalaya. Besides apache seems to have developed a new defect.
 
Why they phased as apache are junk in the Himalaya. Besides apache seems to have developed a new defect.
Apache may not be the best in the Himalayas but they are an indispensable asset at lower altitudes, also Apaches not being great at high altitudes is the reason we developed the LCA Prachcand which is replacing the last sqaudron of Hinds. You should really think before you blabber out BS like a toddler on meth
 
These helicopters are quite large and can be easy targets if they don't have adequate protection from SAM, air to air missiles or against heavy machine guns with armour piercing bullets. India should overhaul the helicopter and keep it in service for another 10 years until we induct more Prachand helicopters.

India need to quickly induct our own Prachand helicopters which are fast and nimble and it can give a large number of mini rockets, missiles and machine gun fire. They should also increase the amount of indigenous content as the foreign content is a bit high which can be reduced squadron by squadron along with developing our own indigenous mini rockets, air to air missiles and installing our ATGM Dhruvastra. Also we need to develop a dedicated medium/heavy attack helicopter which can carry more ATGM missiles, air to air missiles, larger rockets, Gatling or mini gun with a higher calibre. At the same time we need to develop a lot of protection like EW and chaff/flares.
 
Apache may not be the best in the Himalayas but they are an indispensable asset at lower altitudes, also Apaches not being great at high altitudes is the reason we developed the LCA Prachcand which is replacing the last sqaudron of Hinds. You should really think before you blabber out BS like a toddler on meth
Apache have a defect and being on drugs like yourself is not a possibility. Some people think 1970s technology is the greatest stuff. Further you should give up bad habits/.

"WASHINGTON — For nearly two years the Army's fleet of AH-64E Apache attack helicopters have experienced an uptick in the number of electrical power generator failures causing pilots to experience “potentially hazardous” flight conditions including breathing and visibility problems, the Army told Breaking Defense.27 Sept 2023"AIR WARFARE, LAND WARFARE
‘Potentially hazardous’: AH-64E Apache generator failures causing ‘breathing and visibility issues’
“A long-term solution is under investigation. Engineering effort will commence once the program is funded,” an Army spokesman told Breaking Defense.
By ASHLEY ROQUE
on September 27, 2023 at 10:52 AM
 
Our IA & IAF are second to none in sqeezing out the last drop of life from their platforms...but will take centuries for own platforms as replacements, still seeking improvements in Prachand after 13 yrs. from its 1st flight !!
 
The decision to extend the service of Mi-35 attack helicopters until 2030 reflects India's strategic commitment to bolstering its aerial defense capabilities. These "flying tanks" have proven indispensable in various combat scenarios, showcasing their versatility and effectiveness. By retaining these assets, India ensures a formidable presence in the skies, enhancing its ability to counter emerging threats and safeguard national security interests effectively.
 
Our IA & IAF are second to none in sqeezing out the last drop of life from their platforms...but will take centuries for own platforms as replacements, still seeking improvements in Prachand after 13 yrs. from its 1st flight !!
It's amazing how our IA and IAF optimize the utility of their platforms. However, the slow progress towards creating indigenous competitors such as Prachand underscores the importance of more effective innovation steps. ilgms
 
The decision to extend the service life of India's Mi-35 attack helicopters until 2030 reflects their continued relevance in the country's defense strategy. Known as "flying tanks," these helicopters provide crucial support in combat operations with their firepower and versatility. This move underscores India's commitment to maintaining robust aerial capabilities amidst evolving regional security challenges.
 

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