Saab Remains Committed to Indian MRFA Project, Awaits Next Steps

Saab Remains Committed to Indian MRFA Project, Awaits Next Steps


India's ambitious Multi-Role Fighter Aircraft (MRFA) project, aimed at procuring 114 new fighter jets, is a significant endeavor for global aerospace giants.

Swedish defence company Saab, with its Gripen-E offering, expresses a blend of cautious optimism and commitment as it awaits India's next move in this drawn-out procurement process.

Mats Palmberg, Chairman and Managing Director of Saab India, acknowledges the protracted nature of defence acquisitions but remains resolute. Saab has been in the running since submitting its response to the initial Request for Information (RFI) in 2018.

Localization and Partnership: Cornerstones of Saab's Strategy​

Saab's approach hinges heavily on fulfilling India's push for indigenous defence manufacturing. The company proposes establishing an assembly line in India to produce the Gripen-E locally.

This aligns with India's "Make in India" initiative, which prioritizes domestic production and technology transfer. Furthermore, Saab aims to foster a robust supply chain through collaborations with Indian partners, contributing to the growth of India's aerospace industry.

The Gripen-E: Saab's Contender​

Palmberg highlights the Gripen-E's advanced technological features, combat capabilities, and reliability. This multi-role fighter is designed to tackle the evolving security challenges India faces.

Saab believes the Gripen-E addresses India's requirements, but the competition is undoubtedly fierce, with offerings from Dassault Aviation (Rafale), Lockheed Martin (F-21), Boeing (F/A-18), Eurofighter (Typhoon), and Russia.

Collaboration is Key​

Crucial to Saab's efforts is the focus on partnerships and collaborative ventures. The company seeks to transfer technology, work with Indian stakeholders, and empower local talent, ultimately bolstering India's defence manufacturing sector.

International partnerships and synergies with India's industrial base are seen as integral to realizing the full potential of the MRFA project.

The Long and Winding Road​

India's defence procurement processes are notoriously complex and lengthy. This MRFA project is no exception.

Despite the delays, Saab's patience underscores the strategic importance of the Indian market.

The company is determined to navigate the intricacies of the process and hopes the Gripen-E's strengths and a collaborative approach will secure its place in the Indian Air Force's future.
 
Tejas mk2 >>>> gripen E

SIMPLE

But if sab partners with Adani then 56 will do everything to make gripen winner
 
Tejas mk2 >>>> gripen E

SIMPLE

But if sab partners with Adani then 56 will do everything to make gripen winner
Not quite. Gripen doesn't stand much of a chance, and neither does the F-16V for the simple reason that MRFA called for twin-engine fighters from the get go. MRFS is essentially a three-way race between the Rafale, Typhoon, and the F-15EX, with the Rafale having a decided starting advantage.

Of course, MRFA itself is contingent on the MoD actually bothering to release the AoN and move ahead with the tender instead of just sitting around.
 
Apart From winner is MRFA going to move forward, Last Fighter jets purchased by cancelling MMRCA was in 2016 .another 4 to 5 years then First Fighter jet may b delivered ever MRFA happens .atleast 3 to 4 years needed after winner is decleared. (Creating Local Supply chain).
 
If Tejas MK2 gets its First flight next year then SAAB must stop dreaming about selling Gripen to INDIA. MK2 is more indigenous to India than JAS-39 to Sweden.
 
Not quite. Gripen doesn't stand much of a chance, and neither does the F-16V for the simple reason that MRFA called for twin-engine fighters from the get go. MRFS is essentially a three-way race between the Rafale, Typhoon, and the F-15EX, with the Rafale having a decided starting advantage.

Of course, MRFA itself is contingent on the MoD actually bothering to release the AoN and move ahead with the tender instead of just sitting around.
Gripen doesn't stand much of a chance
you dont know what a fraud 56 is...

MRFA itself is wrong...totally avoidable

INSTEAD IAF SHOULD HAVE
200 Tejas mk1
300 Tejas mk2 (need large No of single engine jets for attrition war)
200 ORCA
200 Su
100 AMCA

by 2040 Simple(50 Sq)
 
Not quite. Gripen doesn't stand much of a chance, and neither does the F-16V for the simple reason that MRFA called for twin-engine fighters from the get go. MRFS is essentially a three-way race between the Rafale, Typhoon, and the F-15EX, with the Rafale having a decided starting advantage.

Of course, MRFA itself is contingent on the MoD actually bothering to release the AoN and move ahead with the tender instead of just sitting around.
That’s wrong. There is no such condition in the RFI. RFP hasn’t been issued yet. The tender is open for both single engine and double engine planes as long as they meet the requirements. Gripen just failed to meet the requirements last time.
 
Gripen doesn't stand much of a chance
you dont know what a fraud 56 is...

MRFA itself is wrong...totally avoidable

INSTEAD IAF SHOULD HAVE
200 Tejas mk1
300 Tejas mk2 (need large No of single engine jets for attrition war)
200 ORCA
200 Su
100 AMCA

by 2040 Simple(50 Sq)
There is no ORCA. Stop giving them nonsensical ideas, please.

As it stands, the IAF is planned to comprise 220 Tejas Mk 1/1As (11-12 squadrons), 180-200 Tejas Mk 2 (10 squadrons), 150 MRFA (114 MRFA + 36 Rafales) (8 squadrons), 272 Su-30MKIs (14-15 squadrons), and 120-150 AMCA Mk 1 (7-8 squadrons). That adds up to 50-53 squadrons. However, with Tejas Mk 2 and AMCA still far away in the future, we have to make do with what we have and what we can get soon.
 
That’s wrong. There is no such condition in the RFI. RFP hasn’t been issued yet. The tender is open for both single engine and double engine planes as long as they meet the requirements. Gripen just failed to meet the requirements last time.
My error. I was under the impression that twin-engined aircraft were a negotiable condition in the old RfI and RfP for MMRCA. Still, the Gripen has a very low chance even this time around because of how similar it would be to the Tejas Mk 2.
 
If Tejas MK2 gets its First flight next year then SAAB must stop dreaming about selling Gripen to INDIA. MK2 is more indigenous to India than JAS-39 to Sweden.
The Tejas Mk 2 isn't flying until 2026-27. That is HAL's own estimates. I would actually posit adding another year or two to that to factor in their inefficiencies.
 
That’s wrong. There is no such condition in the RFI. RFP hasn’t been issued yet. The tender is open for both single engine and double engine planes as long as they meet the requirements. Gripen just failed to meet the requirements last time.
If you listen to what the airforce has said, it will be clear that air force does not want to import single engine fighters. Same for the navy. We can build them on our own, using own design. Gripen has no chance
 
India should go for either F-15EX or Rafale. Bost are excellent fighters, but there are other factors as well.

F-15 is a boeing aircraft. Boeing has excellent relations with India. It is already manufacturing some stuff in india for its global supply chain. So I believe it will be easier for them to build F-15 in India. Also, it will be helpful in geopolitics by deeping relation between India and US.

France has supplied rafale before, so it is an advantage. But buying french aircraft does not really offer any geopolitical or foreign policy advantage. If you buy american aircraft, they will support yoi through thick and thin. Proof is that US recently gave a package to pakistan to extend F-16 life even after India voiced concern publicly.

Also, F-15 is cheaper and deliveries will be faster, and access to spares will be smoother since america is a juggernaut when it comes to aircraft manufacturing. Access to more US tech will be advantage as well, since we will be using it on future aircraft
 
If you listen to what the airforce has said, it will be clear that air force does not want to import single engine fighters. Same for the navy. We can build them on our own, using own design. Gripen has no chance
The RFI was issued by IAF and it clearly says both the varieties are welcome.
 
My error. I was under the impression that twin-engined aircraft were a negotiable condition in the old RfI and RfP for MMRCA. Still, the Gripen has a very low chance even this time around because of how similar it would be to the Tejas Mk 2.
I won’t argue with that. Just that the tender is open to all. Say, if F35 enters or Su75 surprisingly turns out to be a great plane at a great price, they won’t be rejected just because they are single engine.
 
India must go with the F-15EX as Boeing intends to create a full-fledged manufacturing plant and also help India with its 5th Generation AMCA project and its manufacturing too.

If needed, then India can order an additional 36 Rafales if France/Dassault/Safran creates full-fledged MRO and upgrade and test facilities.

India gains nothing from Gripen.
 
The RFI was issued by IAF and it clearly says both the varieties are welcome.
These things are done so that the guy you want to buy from lowers the cost. You have to read between the lines. Various IAF chiefs and senior IAF people have made preference clear for twin engine fighters. And since India is already producing its own single engine fighters, there is 0 real chance of IAF going for foreign single engine fighter
 
India is not going to move ahead with the MRFA deal at all. The project is very expensive and will cost over $20 billion even if most of the parts or equipment are made in India. Once you add on the other procurement jets and helicopters the IAF need to make like the basic trainer, intermediate trainer, Tejas MK1A, Tejas MK2, Dhruv helicopter, Prachand LCH, LUH, IMRH and possible armed version, armed drones, surveillance drones, swarm drones etc will be very very expensive. We will also need to buy other equipment, technology and make upgrades with the Super Sukhoi project, upgrade Mig 29, MRO Mirage 2000, MRO Mil 17, MRO jet engines, MRO helicopter engines etc. All of these projects will cost a huge amount of money which the IAF will not be able to afford so buying very large and very expensive foreign imports does not benefit us at all.

India will most likely scrap the MRFA project after they start flying the Tejas MK2 by next year as it will be just as good as the Rafale jet which is the main preference by the IAF. Even if they make the jet with a Indian company the amount of technology and indigenous production will be low and it won't include any critical technology like engines, avionics, radars etc. India needs to focus more on its indigenous projects and speed up the progress by employing more workers and employ a day and night shifts so that progress is made even quicker.
 
These things are done so that the guy you want to buy from lowers the cost. You have to read between the lines. Various IAF chiefs and senior IAF people have made preference clear for twin engine fighters. And since India is already producing its own single engine fighters, there is 0 real chance of IAF going for foreign single engine fighter
So if US offers F35 we won’t buy it? (Assuming price,ToT and other technicalities are sorted out)
 

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